Rossignol X-6 SC Combi Cross-Country Ski Boot

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Normally, I (Stella) do not post product reviews for personal items (clothing, packs, etc.) until I’ve used them a few times. However, I am so pleased with the Rossignol X-6 SC Combi Cross-Country Ski Boot that I need to break the news about it! I have always had difficulty finding gear that fit my feet properly, and any time that I need to purchase a new boot, shoe, sandal, etc. it has been a disaster – I dread it. But this time was an exception.

I needed to find a replacement for my old Rossignol classic cross-country ski boots (Rossignol X3 FW Womens NNN), which are at least eight years old. And despite all of the skiing that I had done in those boots over the years, they had never fit comfortably. The extra thick padding around the ankle area is way too thick – it severely dug into my legs, leaving them sore to even the slightest touch. So why did I wait so long to replace them? Why had I tolerated such extreme discomfort? Because I dread shopping for footwear! Fortunately, the day came where replacing them was a necessity.

A few weeks ago, I took a skate skiing lesson at the Grand Lake Nordic Center, where we frequent in the winter months. I enjoyed the experience, and decided to purchase a combi boot that would allow for both classic and skate skiing. Thus began my search for a new boot. The following week, we were at Snow Mountain Ranch Nordic Center, where I had rented the Rossignol X-6 SC Combi Cross-Country Ski Boot, and I fell in love with it. I had purchased a brand new pair that day.

FIT/COMORT: This boot sits about an inch higher on my leg (than a traditional classic ski boot), and does not have any ankle padding. Instead, it’s a thin neoprene-like sleeve that sit around the ankle. You then lace the boot and zip up the outer material over the top of it. Behind the boot is a plastic ‘brace’ that you pull forward around the ankle, and then velcro the strap closed around the front to the desired tightness. I have found that this boot provides ample ankle support for both forms of skiing – this is particularly important for skate skiing. 

Top view of the Rossignol X-6 SC

With many skate skiing boots, the plastic ‘brace’ at the back of the boot that rotates forward around the ankle is very uncomfortable in my ankle area – it digs into my leg. But the brace system on this boot is not bothersome at all. And, the velcro strap along the front of the boot stays in place well, but I think I did need to adjust it a few times. For example, when I had fallen, the velcro strap came up over the top of the boot because of the way my ankle had twisted. But fixing them back into the correct position was easy to do. 

*SIDE NOTE: Be sure to keep the round cardboard rolls that come with the boot (that fit inside of it), and put them back into the boot when not in use. This will prevent the inner layer of the boot (the part that wraps around your ankle) from folding/curving inward. And, when you put the boot on, be sure to use the loophole to keep that fabric layer straight when you slide your foot in, also to prevent it from folding inward. If the lip (top edge) of that material starts to curve inward, it will cut into your leg and be very uncomfortable.

Looking inside the Rossignol X-6 SC

SIZING: Remember that when you are exercising, your body temperature increases, resulting in a slight expansion of your feet. And since it’s winter, normally a thicker sock is needed. My shoe size is a 5.5-6, so I decided upon a size 37 boot (this is a unisex boot). The 36 was more snug, but I kept in mind that my feet would expand, and I wanted to be able to accommodate a slightly thicker sock in colder temperatures if needed. Usually, I wear a mid-weight, moisture-wicking sock that is adequate for temperatures down to the single digits.

*SIDE NOTE: As with all of my other footwear, I always replace the sole with my personal preference of orthotic insert. Heel blisters are always a concern with new outdoor footwear. I have been on a painful learning curve in this regard over the last few years with other active outdoor footwear products, particularly winter boots used for snowshoeing. A vital component of that preventing heel blisters is ensuring that the product has a deep heel cup. This is something to note if you put too thick of an insert into your footwear, because it will raise your heel, thus preventing the heel from resting perfectly within that heel cup. I recently skied over seven miles in these boots and did not acquire any friction against my heels whatsoever. And simply walking around in these boots, without the skis, is comfortable as well. 

FINAL THOUGHTS: I know that some people prefer to have specific boots, dedicated for classic and skate skiing. However, I found that the Rossignol X-6 SC Combi Ski Boot is the best choice for me – all around. Please note that Rossingnol’s website states that these boots have the “speed lace lock system.” However, the pair that I had purchased does not have that lacing system – they may be the previous year’s model. And even though I really like the speed lace lock system, and enjoy it on my other forms of footwear, that is a minor detail to me.


Overall: Excellent Purchase

Price paid: $200

Place Purchased: Snow Mountain Ranch Nordic Center

Link to Snow Mountain Ranch Website: Snow Mountain Ranch

Note: This blog receives no payment or other compensation for reviews of products or services. If I/we did not pay full retail price for a product being reviewed, I/we will explicitly state that in the review. Unless explicitly stated, I/we have no affiliation or relationship with the product being reviewed.

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